A few weeks with the System76 Gazelle Pro

After writing about choosing and unboxing, I was going to write this post after two weeks of using my new laptop. It’s been over a month because I’ve busy with a Coursera course and – well – the laptop has just kinda worked. In fact, it’s been so uneventful that there’s not all that much to write about, but I’ve now tried three distributions on it.

Ubuntu 12.10

It arrived as described with Ubuntu installed, and pretty much everything worked, as you’d expect. The problem I could find was pointed out thanks to @TechHomeBacon on twitter:

@brabster @system76 comes out of the box saying graphics “unknown”

— Tech Home The Bacon (@TechHomeBacon) April 25, 2013

However, the folks @System76 replied, explaining how to resolve the issue:

@techhomebacon @brabster sudo apt-get install mesa-utils’ fixes the description. mesa-utils isn’t installed by default.

— System76 (@system76) April 25, 2013

A minor niggle. As I said in my previous post, I’m not a fan of the Unity desktop so enough of that – the first thing I did was start again and install Kubuntu.

Kubuntu 12.10

The install of Kubuntu, a derivative of Ubuntu based on the KDE desktop, was uneventful. There were no problems and everything worked out of the box – sound, graphics, touchpad – all working. Not much to say, but Ubuntu to Kubuntu use the same underlying distribution and I’m already familiar with both, so I decided to try something a little more challenging.

Arch

Arch Linux is an fairly popular lightweight distribution more geared to folks who like to get their hands dirty, so the setup is more involved and exposes more of what’s going on. It’s not based on Ubuntu, and this machine wasn’t built with Arch in mind. I should also mention that I’ve never used Arch before, so I was expecting more problems.

The setup was certainly more interesting, but entirely due to the more involved nature of Arch and my lack of general smarts. The hardware worked just fine, picking up the right packages without any special configuration. Dammit, still nothing juicy to talk about!

I have noticed a couple of things that often don’t work properly. First, Ctrl-F7 toggled my display between laptop panel and external monitor out of the box, which is fantastically helpful as I’m constantly plugging in an external monitor. Next, my USB hub has an ethernet port and sound hardware on board – these also both worked out of the box.

In Conclusion

So far, I would recommend to a friend.

All the hardware works under all three distributions. Although I bought the lowest-spec i7 processor and the Intel graphics hardware is relatively modest, KDE is a joy to use, silky smooth through all the desktop effects. It’s very quiet in normal use with no discernible fan noise. The laptop keyboard has enough space and tactile feedback to be comfortable in use for extended periods – this is of course subjective, but it works well for me. The display panel is clear and bright when the ambient light isn’t so bright as to cause excessive reflections, as you’d expect.

An Aside

I find it surprising that people still write articles criticising Linux as not ready for the desktop, or the casual user. Quotes such as “Is it bad if I say that I was impressed that sound worked right out of the box?” on a recent Ars Technica article brought this to mind as I bought this laptop, and my experience with a multitude of distributions over the past few years leads me to the opposite view – that many distributions tend to work without fuss and seem quite capable of meeting the needs of a typical, casual user. I may try and talk my wife (a Windows 7 user when she’s not tapping and swiping on her iPad) into trying out a suitable distribution for a while, to try and see the experience from a more casual perspective…

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